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PROFILE UPDATES


•   Colin Harris  8/22
•   Mike Slater  8/3
•   John Block (Block)  6/24
•   Arthur Godbeer  6/17
•   Brian Christie  6/17
•   Michael Woodford  6/16
•   John Gomersall  6/16
•   Fred Broom (Class Of 1964)  5/23
•   David Morty (Class Of 1962)  5/8
•   Geoffrey Ditz  3/23
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WHERE ARE THEY NOW


WHERE WE LIVE


Who lives where - click links below to find out.

1 lives in Arizona (USA)
3 live in California (USA)
1 lives in Colorado (USA)
1 lives in Connecticut (USA)
2 live in Massachusetts (USA)
1 lives in Oregon (USA)
1 lives in Pennsylvania (USA)
1 lives in Ontario (Canada)
7 live in Eastern Cape
1 lives in Free State
18 live in Gauteng
108 live in KwaZulu-Natal
7 live in Western Cape
10 live in USA
1 lives in Canada
13 live in Australia
1 lives in Germany
1 lives in Ireland
2 live in Israel
2 live in New Zealand
1 lives in Sweden
16 live in United Kingdom
4 location unknown

MISSING CLASSMATES


Know the email address of a missing Classmate? Click here to contact them!

 

Welcome To The Durban High School

Class of 1963 Website

This website was established to locate as many members of our DHS Class of 1963 as possible, and to encourage them to attend the 50th class reunion in Durban on June 7, 8 and 9, 2013.

Now that the reunion has been held, the objective of this website is to maintain the connections that the reunion renewed, and to encourage those who are not already participating in the communication engendered by this website to do so.  It is also intended as the vehicle by which the Class of 1963 will create a bursary fund to sponsor the attendance of a deserving pupil at DHS (see below).

Please refer to the report on our successful reunion on the 50 Year Reunion page of this website. 

* * *

THE OLD SCHOOL BUILDING – A DESCRIPTION

 

The classic and gracious – but in the 1960s somewhat dilapidated - old school building, which was erected in 1894, was primarily used for the boarding establishment.  The building was demolished in the late 1960s, and replaced by the existing building.  How the Old Boys and other interested parties allowed the building to be demolished – rather than at least retaining the front section of the building, and erecting a new building behind it – boggles my mind.  But when this all happened I was enjoying the good life as a Natal University student – had the demolition occurred when I was at a more mature age I might have tried to marshal some Old Boys to fight the demolition.

 

 

 

 The Old School Building In The 1960s

 

The main entrance of the boarding establishment was in the centre of the covered verandah that ran the length of the façade, and was decorated with an attractive gable.  Immediately on entering the building there was a short passage, with an exit door from the prefects’ room on the left, and a blank wall with notice boards on the right.  At the end of that short passage there was a two storey entrance lobby, with a corridor to the left and another to the right.  The left corridor led to the library, past the entrance door to the prefects’ room on the left.  The corridor then proceeded past the entrance door to a classroom/utility room also on the left, and opposite that a door on the right leading to the quadrangle; and then at the end of the corridor were the double doors of the library entrance (which room may well have initially been the school hall). 

 

To the right from the entrance lobby the passage led to the boarder’s dining room, past a door to the left also accessing the quadrangle, through double doors at the end of the passage into the dining room.

 

 

Plan of the Old School Building, With Dates of Construction

 

The dining room was a large rectangular room laid out rather like the depiction of such a facility in the Harry Potter films.  On the St. Thomas Road end of the dining room was a raised platform with a long table at which the boarder masters sat facing towards the boarders.  In front of the masters, and parallel with the façade of the school, were two long tables next to each other running the length of the room.  Third formers sat at the table nearest to the front of the building, with Fourth and Fifth formers at the next table, and the matrics and prefects at two smaller tables located parallel to the long tables on the quadrangle side of the room.  

 

Back to the lobby, on the quadrangle side there was a staircase that ascended along the right hand side wall, onto an intermediate landing along the rear wall, and then ascending along the left hand side wall, to a second floor corridor which ran the length of the building, parallel to the façade. 

 

Behind the back wall of the lobby downstairs was the “Boot Room”, where the boarders kept their shoes in open cubicles in shelves around the walls (the room was also used as a private place to rub your bum after being flogged!). 

 

At the top of the stairs from the ground floor of the lobby was the boarder master’s lounge, with its bay window, above which was an attractive exterior gable.  On each side of the lounge were two master’s rooms.  Off the corridor running the length of the building upstairs, on the St. Thomas Road side of the second master’s room, was the “Middle 1” dormitory for Fourth Formers, which overlooked the sports fields. Continuing in that direction the corridor led to the matron’s quarters, which were accessed from the corridor and by an entrance near the headmaster’s office downstairs on the first floor.  In the opposite direction the corridor led past the “Middle 2” Fifth Form dormitory on the left, then past a door on the right leading to the balcony dormitories, then to the “Top Left” Fifth Form dormitory on the left and the “Top Right” matric dormitory on the right, and finally to the head prefect’s room between the latter two dormitories (The Top Left and Top Right dormitories were directly above the library.)

 

On exiting the corridor through the door opposite Middle 2, to the balcony dormitories, one passed the Fourth Form “Verandah 1” dormitory on the left, and then also the Third Form “Verandah 2” dormitory on the left, on the Windmill Road side of the quadrangle.  After the Verandah 2 dormitory, in the corner of the building, was the room of the head boarder master – “Charlie” Crewe in the 1960s.  The corridor then took a right turn, with a stairway down to the 3rd Form bathroom.  Following the right turn, next came the “Verandah 3” and “Verandah 4” Third Form dormitories, on the Vause Road side of the quadrangle.  At the end of the balcony was the Sixth Form bathroom.  Next to the bathroom was an external stairway down to the quadrangle.

 

On the ground floor the quadrangle had a covered verandah around its Windmill Road and Vause Road perimeter, with classrooms on the two sides underneath the Verandah 1 through 4 dormitories.  On the Windmill Road side there was a large room that was – I think – known as the “boarder’s library, which the 4th and 5th Form boarders used as the room in which they did prep (i.e. their homework).  Beyond the boarder’s library was a corridor to the left, which ran parallel to Vause Road and had two or three classrooms.  The corridor then made a left turn, parallel to Windmill Road, and opening up under a verandah, with three or four classrooms to the right.  Two of those classrooms were later turned into a gymnasium.  On the Vause Road side of the quadrangle, in the part of the building shown in the background of the Blackmore’s house photograph of 1963 which is reproduced below, were two more classrooms.  In addition to the classrooms, the third form bathroom was in the corner (to the left of the photo), and the 4th and 5th Form bathrooms were on the right of the photo. 

 

 Blackmore’s House 1963: Vause Road Side Of The Quadrangle In The

Background, With Verandah 3 and 4 Dormitories Upstairs, and Head Boarder Master Charlie Crewe and Headmaster A. W. McIver in the Front Row

 

The quadrangle was used for boarders’ assemblies before breakfast (at 7.15 a.m.) and before dinner (at 6.00 p.m.) each day.  The boarders would line up under the verandah surrounding the quadrangle, with the 6th Formers against the side wall of the boot room (unless it was raining), the 5th Formers starting adjacent to the passage past the entrance to the prefects’ room, and proceeding along the Windmill Road side of the quadrangle, followed by the 4th and 3rd Formers until about as far as behind the house photo, above.

 

On the portion of the verandah of the quadrangle on the other side of the boot room, and adjacent the corridor leading to the dining room, was a large table with benches on each side which was used by the cadets – and primarily the school band – to “bone” their boots and whiten their putties and belts and polish their instruments.

 

The section of the boarding establishment comprising the Verandah 1 through 4 dormitories and the classrooms and other facilities below were not part of the building erected in 1894 – they were added in 1919.  The classrooms down the passage that ran from the middle of the Windmill Road side of quadrangle were added in 1910 and 1911.

 

 

An Early Photograph of The St. Thomas Road End Of The Old School Building

 

On the Thomas Road side of the building – pictured above – the ground floor comprised the headmaster’s office (on the corner), and the deputy headmaster’s office – and, I think, a sitting room for visitors.  On the Vause Road side of the headmaster’s office was the school secretary’s office and administrative offices, and next to that the sick room.

 

On the first floor above the facilities described in the previous paragraph was the flat of the matron of the boarding establishment.

Finally, on the ground floor off the St. Thomas Road side of the quadrangle, and on the Windmill Road side of the administrative offices, was the kitchen of the boarding establishment.

 

As will be apparent from the above description, when built the old school building included all the facilities needed to accommodate a school with the characteristics of an English public school.  And with an elegant building of the kind that one would expect in a growing country within the British Empire!

 

 

An Early Photograph of The Old School Building Before Terracing

 

Finally, the above photo shows the school in its early days – long before the terracing, which may have been added in the early 1950s when the swimming pool was built.

 

Stuart “Mossie” Clark

July, 2019

* * * 

October 2017 Visit to DHS

Late last year I visited DHS to meet Louis Arde’, the new CEO of the DHS Foundation.  I was met at the school by our classmate Howard Buttery, who introduced me to Louis.  While at the school I also caught up with another classmate – Jerry Oddy, who is now the School historian. 

Jerry gave me a tour of the school, and I was very much impressed indeed with what I saw.  What first impressed me was the courtesy of the boys.  Almost every boy with whom I made eye contact as we walked the corridors politely said “good morning.”  And all of them were neatly dressed in their full school uniforms.  Also impressive were the facilities – especially the media centre (the modern equivalent of what we knew as a library), the Seabrooke Theatre (where I dropped in on an impromptu series of skits), and the Victor Daitz Mathematics and Science Center. 

Those of you who attended the Founder’s Day dinner in the year of our class 50th anniversary will remember the impassioned plea of after dinner speaker Stephen Saad for Old Boys to financially support the school by contributing to the DHS Foundation – even by small monthly contributions.  Steve bemoaned the decline in the school’s academic and sporting performance, and reputation, to the extent that Old Boys were sending their sons to schools other than DHS. 

The mission of the Trust, in the words of its website is:

to provide additional financial support for capital development of the school in order to ensure that fees do not become prohibitively expensive and, secondly, to provide scholarships, be they full or part, for students who are unable to meet the financial demands of an education at DHS but who have exceptional merit in academics, sport or cultural pursuits and would be an asset to the school.

I have not lived in Durban for many years, so I was out of touch with the extent of competitive bidding between high schools for the best students – especially, apparently, those who play rugby!  The bait is typically bursaries and other financial sponsorship incentives – an arena in which DHS was not competing five years ago. 

In the five years since Steve’s speech, DHS has made remarkable strides.  The school facilities have been improved by the refurbishment of Blackmores, the creation of the media centre and theatre and science and mathematics facilities referred to above, and the general refurbishment of the physical assets of the school.  The school’s academic offerings and results have also continued to improve to reach the highest level.  And, last but not least, the performance of the school’s teams has greatly improved too – last year the 1st XV beat Glenwood for the first time in years! (However, there is still much room for improvement, as today I saw the results of the weekend cricket matches against Westville!)  

Louis and Howard brought me up to date on the activities of the Foundation, and especially its aggressive efforts to provide funding for scholarships that can be offered to attract the best boys to attend the school.  As of the time of my visit there were 53 fully funded bursaries available, and the target is to have at least 150 within three years – of which the Foundation has agreed to provide 30.  Our Class of 1963 Bursary Fund is making its own small contribution to the Foundation’s efforts, by partially sponsoring a scholarship for boarder Matthew Delderfield (while hoping to eventually create a sufficient principal amount in the bursary fund to provide a full bursary). 

The bottom line – based on my morning at the school – is that DHS is well on its way back, and is fulfilling a key role in producing young men who will make a positive contribution to their communities and society.  Have a look at the recent video released by the school as part of its marketing efforts, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUEDdQHTCRQ&feature=youtu.be (note the return of the basher!).   

If you have not yet contributed to the Class of 1963 Bursary Fund – of if you have already done and want to top up your contribution – please consider supporting your old school and its mission by making a contribution now.  Bank transfer details can be found on the Class of 1963 Bursary Fund page of the website www.durbanhighschoolclassof1963.com.  Otherwise, please email me at lgclarx@aol.com and I’ll provide whatever information you need to make your contribution.

Stuart “Mossie” Clark

February 20, 2018

* * *

Report on DHS 150th Anniversary Events

Perhaps the best way to report on the 150th Anniversary events is to reprint the June 10, 2016 DHS Herald, which appears below:

If you do not recive the DHS Herald, but would like to, please send an email to  editor@durbanhighschool.co.za, and ask to be added to the emailing list.

Best regards,

Stuart “Mossie” Clark

Posted June 15, 2016

* * *

Class of 1963 Bursary Fund Established

On August 13, 2013 the DHS Class of 1963 Committee announced the establishment of a Class of 1963 Bursary Fund, to sponsor the attendance of a deserving pupil at DHS.  The objective is to raise a capital amount of R585,000 to fund this bursary, which it is hoped will be awarded for the first time for attendance at the School in 2017.

The R585,000 represents a R150 contribution per month for the 39 months between October, 2013 and December 2016, by an estimated 100 class members (or the lump sum equivalent).  However contributions of any amount will be welcomed - class members are encouraged to contribute according to their ability and inclinations.

For further information about the bursary fund, and how to contribute, please click on the "Class of 1963 Bursary Fund" page of this website.

Thanks in anticipation for your interest and support!

* * *

Even though the reunion has come and gone, please complete your profile in the Classmate Profiles section of the website if you have not already done so.

If you have not already done so, please complete your profile on the website - preferably including a summary of what you have been up to in the past 50 years, and by adding a current photograph. 

Also please advise me if you know of the whereabouts of anyone on the classmates list who has not signed up - or give them the website address and suggest that they should sign up.  We need to track down as many class members as possible!

With kind regards to all my classmates of so many years ago,

Stuart “Mossie” Clark

 

Websites For Other Class Years

There are other class websites for the following DHS class years – if you are a member of any of those classes, contact the website administrator to activate your profile:

1960 – http://www.dhs-class-of-1960.net/ - macornelissen@shaw.ca (Michael Cornelissen)

1961 - http://www.dhs-class-of-1961.net/ - drianrobertson@gmail.com (Ian Robertson)

1963 - http://www.durbanhighschoolclassof1963.com/ - lgclarx@aol.com (Stuart Clark)

1964 - http://www.dhsclassof1964.com/ - gabbybell@gmail.com (Graham Bell)

1965 - http://www.dhsclassof65.net/ - terry.sandy @chep.com (Terry Sandy)

1966 - http://www.dhs-class-of-1966.com/ - cedric @cornerstonec.co.za (Cedric Parker)

1988 – website in the course of construction - contact Andrew Stringer at ganginoz @gmail.com 

 

 Other Websites Of Interest

 

Durban High School - www.durbanhighschool.co.za/

 

DHS Foundation - http://www.dhsfoundation.co.za/